While Philly suburbs loom large, battle for House is showing up across Pennsylvania

While Philly suburbs loom large, battle for House is showing up across Pennsylvania

From Pottstown to Lock Haven, West Chester to Fox Chapel, election season is now in full swing.

While the much prophesied “blue wave” has a real chance to wash in a new Democratic House majority in Washington DC, it’ll likely crest too low to overturn the 39-seat Republican majority in Harrisburg’s House.

Plenty of GOP seats, especially in the southeast, appear primed for flips. But Democrats need to defend a caucus spread out into places that run red the length of the ballot, while their strategists know that any path, no matter how slim, to an eventual majority needs to include a few tough, uphill fights.
Friday, September 14, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
House leadership discussing rule changes on harassment as legislative fix looks uncertain

House leadership discussing rule changes on harassment as legislative fix looks uncertain

Both House caucuses Thursday said their respective leadership teams have discussed chamber rule changes to create a standard policy on harassment, as a bill to change the law itself on Capitol complaints appeared stalled.

House Republican spokesperson Steve Miskin said that the changes around sexual harassment would apply to both staffers and members could be implemented soon.

“We’ve been in very strong discussion with Democratic leaders in changing House Rules and having a unified policy,” Miskin said.

Thursday, September 6, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Even though ruled law of the land, how to put Janus into state code sparks controversy

Even though ruled law of the land, how to put Janus into state code sparks controversy

A hearing on a legislative response to the Supreme Court’s Janus ruling got a little chippy Wednesday as lawmakers attempted to discredit testimony on the politically charged topic of public sector unions.

With the 5-4 June decision from the country’s highest court, unions representing government employees can no longer ask every workplace member for agency fees.

However, state law still allows for the charging of agency fees, whether involuntary or voluntarily, and Rep. Kate Klunk (R-York) introduced her bill, HB 2571, to put the commonwealth in compliance with the new interpretation.

Wednesday, September 5, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
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