As abuse victims line hallways, debate rages behind closed doors over civil window

As abuse victims line hallways, debate rages behind closed doors over civil window

With a well-tailored pinstripe suit, white pocket square and small black ribbon pin, Arthur Baselice stood sentinel by the door to the office of Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati (R-Jefferson).

Quietly, the former Philadelphia police detective held a sign with a picture of his son, Arthur III, and the two priests who abused him as a high schooler. The younger Arthur ended up dying of a drug overdose while attempting to deal with the trauma.

Occasionally wiping away tears, occasionally profane, Baselice, one of dozens of survivors to fill the Senate Monday, relayed his belief that the Senate needed to pass SB 261. The bill sponsored by Scarnati was amended in the House to include an option Scarnati calls unconstitutional and opposes: the civil window.

Monday, October 15, 2018/Author: Kara Barmoy
Civil window debate snarls up grand jury report response

Civil window debate snarls up grand jury report response

A preliminary offer from the Pennsylvania Senate that does not allow for retroactive civil suits has strained negotiations on the legislative response to the grand jury report.

The offer, first reported by the Philadelphia Inquirer, includes a tribunal of state appeals judges tasked with handing out money from a defined fund, which a senate memo describes as “the most compensation a victim can receive in the timeliest manner possible.”

Any organization could pay in to settle child abuse cases. The panel would audit groups to determine how much funding each could reasonably offer, and victims would have one year to make claims.
Friday, October 12, 2018/Author: Kara Barmoy
Senate Appropriations Committee to limit consideration of non-fiscal amendments

Senate Appropriations Committee to limit consideration of non-fiscal amendments

In its first meeting of the 2017-2018 legislative term, the Senate Appropriations Committee adopted an operating policy that would limit the ability of the committee to consider amendments outside the fiscal implications of legislation.

 

In the past, the committee has been the Senate-jurisdiction-of-last-resort for some wishing to change legislation as standing committees often try to move the process along without consideration of amendments.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017/Author: Jason Gottesman
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